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Bret's Blogisphere

I like to use my BLOGS to keep my friends informed of the daily Mess(es) that are going on with us and adding items of interest others might find enjoyable. Thanks for stopping by and please feel free to leave a comment. Bret

Daiquiri Day!
Posted:Jul 18, 2018 9:33 pm
Last Updated:Jul 18, 2018 11:21 pm
31 Views


Need a way to cool off?



Why not celebrate Daiquiri Day!



This refreshing drink was invented in the early 1900’s in a small mining town of Daiquiri near Santiago, Cuba, an engineer named Jennings Stockton Cox created a simple drink called a Daiquiri. Cox came up with this concoction in an effort to cool down during the summer month, with a simple blend of lime juice, sugar and local Bacardi rum, over cracked ice. This he found to be the best way to boost the morale of mine workers during the hot months. Such was the success of Cox’s drink not only did he received a generous stipend from the company, he also received a monthly gallon of Bacardi to continue supplying the refreshing drink.

6 Comments
A Century
Posted:Jul 17, 2018 7:34 pm
Last Updated:Jul 18, 2018 11:57 pm
213 Views


Sometimes posting a blog can be A bit of a chore, other times fun, and then comes the pleasurable ones where you don't know how to cut it down into a few minutes read time with some good photos to go with it. This is one of those great pleasures to post marking one hundred years since Nelson Mandela was born in Mvezo, Cape Province, South Africa on July 18, 1918.



After studying law at the University of Fort Hare and the University of Witwatersrand, he later found work as a lawyer in Johannesburg. In 1943, he joined the African National Congress, which fought against the widespread oppression of black South Africans, and became politically active, fighting against colonialism and later the institution of apartheid by the ruling National Party in 1948. Mandela soon emerged as a key leader in the resistance to the apartheid laws, being arrested multiple times and later being sentenced to life in prison in 1964 after being trialed for conspiring to overthrow the government.



Amid growing pressure both internally and throughout the world, the South African government finally released Mandela after 27 years in 1990. He soon worked alongside President F.W. de Klerk to dismantle the apartheid regime in 1991 and usher in the peaceful 1994 general election in which he was elected as the country’s new president.



During his presidency from May 1994 to June 1999, Mandela worked to promote racial reconciliation, fight poverty and expand healthcare for all South Africans. After leaving office, he remained active in many philanthropic efforts throughout the world, particularly ending the HIV/AIDS crisis and reducing poverty.



For his efforts promoting social justice, democracy and peace, he was awarded dozens of prestigious accolades, including the Nobel Peace Prize and the U.S. Presidential Medal of Freedom. Mandela passed away on December 5, 2013 at age 95, but not before becoming known as one of the most prominent and respected civil rights leaders and humanitarians of the modern era.



IF the movie INVICTUS is available to you Morgan Freeman portrays Mandela to a tee! Matt Damon's interaction to bring South Africa's Rugby team from the depths to win the World Cup breaking the chains of apartheid and bringing the nation together.

10 Comments
Surprise Gift
Posted:Jul 16, 2018 9:42 pm
Last Updated:Jul 17, 2018 1:31 pm
318 Views


My long time friend Alex has a birthday coming up... He's already gotten what he thinks is all his presents... but I am sending him another little surprise in the mail.



At night when we were back home we started watching the series I Claudius by Robert Graves and produced by the BBC.



He enjoyed the series so much I bought him his own Emperor Claudius coin which features Claudius on one side.



and the Goddess Minerva on the other.



I have it mounted and framed for him to either hang on the wall or set on a dresser.
8 Comments
Wrong Way !!!
Posted:Jul 16, 2018 9:03 pm
Last Updated:Jul 17, 2018 1:35 pm
320 Views


Happy 90th Anniversary of Wrong Way Corrigan Day !



Wrong Way Corrigan Day commemorates July 17, 1938 when Douglas Corrigan made a transatlantic flight.



He had recently purchased a 1929 Curtiss Robin plane and rebuilt and modified it. In July of 1938, he flew it from California to New York. He then applied for permission to make a transatlantic flight but was denied.



On July 17, 1938, he flew out of Floyd Bennett field Brooklyn, New York, with the supposed intention of flying back to California. He instead started heading east and flew all the way to Dublin, Ireland. As he disembarked from the plane he said, "Just got in from New York. Where am I?” He claimed his flight had been an accident and he had gotten lost after his compass failed to work. His pilot's licence was suspended, but was soon reinstated.



He became a celebrity and gained the name Wrong Way Corrigan. Until his death in 1995, he maintained that his transatlantic flight had been done by accident. In 1987, in Long Island, he was honored on the 49th anniversary of his flight. Beginning in 1992, his hometown of Galveston, Texas, began celebrating Wrong Way Corrigan Day. Corrigan has since been celebrated across the country on Wrong Way Corrigan Day.
8 Comments
Avoiding the Backlash !
Posted:Jul 15, 2018 10:32 pm
Last Updated:Jul 16, 2018 8:34 pm
502 Views


I am not going to cover FOOD at such a late hour instead I shall go with my second favorite topic.... MONEY!



The first copper coins were minted when Sweden introduced the copper standard in 1624. The reasons for this are the shortage of silver and gold due to the prolonged wars, and a desire to maintain the price of copper, which was Sweden's most important export product.At first, only square-shaped small coins were minted, known as "clippings". But these were easy to reduce in size without anyone really noticing and they were therefore replaced after only a few years with round copper coins.



Falu copper mine accounted for 2/3 of Europe's copper supply during the first half of the 17th century. The idea was that by using some of all the copper extracted in the mines for domestic coinage, the volume of copper exported would decline, which would push up the price.



As copper is worth less than silver, large plates of copper were needed to replace small silver coins. The largest copper coin weighed almost 20 kilos or 45 pounds. Sweden had problems selling all the copper produced in the country. This was an important reason behind the minting of a great number of large copper coins up until 1644. For obvious reasons, the coins were not particularly convenient for business transactions.



It was Johan Palmstruch, founder of Stockholms Bank, Sweden's first bank, who issued the banknotes. The background to this was that, in 1660, the central government had started to mint new coins of a lower weight than the older ones. This meant that many depositors wanted their old, heavier coins back, as they had a higher metal value. This led to a bank run. To counteract this, Palmstruch started to issue deposit certificates. This was a security that gave the owner the right to withdraw the deposited amount in coins.



The special thing about the deposit certificates, which were called credit notes, was that the bank was no longer dependent on having MONEY deposited to be able to lend. Instead, the new certificates were handed out as loans from the bank. They could be used to purchase anything and so the first banknotes in Europe were invented on July 16, 1661... 357 years ago today. The new thing about Palmstruch's banknotes was that they were not linked to any deposit. Instead, they were based on the general public's confidence that the bank would pay the value of the note in coins upon demand.


(The largest copper coin weighed almost 20 kilos 45 lbs]

The banknotes quickly became popular as they were more convenient than the heavy and cumbersome coins made of copper. During the following years, the bank printed more and more notes. This led towards them falling in value, a phenomenon we now know as inflation. Confidence was finally lost among the general public and many people demanded that their notes be redeemed. But Stockholms Bank did not have enough coins and therefore started to demand the loans it had granted be repaid. It ended with a bank failure and many people suffered financial problems.



The Council of the Realm – the government of the time – decided in 1664 that the loans would be repaid and that the credit notes would be withdrawn. By this act Sweden created the First Government Central Bank in Europe. Palmstruch was ordered to appear before the Svea Court of Appeal and was sentenced to death for mismanagement of the bank in 1668. He was reprieved but remained in prison until 1670 and died the following year.



I did a little math on the side. The banknote above was for 100 dalers. With the silver coin of the era that came to about 5.5 pounds of silver or 2 kilos The half daler copper plate coin in picture #2 weighed . 365 grams. One hundred dalers is 161 pounds (73 kilos) of copper coins. I can fully understand why the general public would want to switch to the ease of banknotes.
16 Comments
Police Surveillance
Posted:Jul 14, 2018 9:25 pm
Last Updated:Jul 18, 2018 10:32 pm
1111 Views


A recent Police Surveillance captured the following conversation between my OLD Friends Bisex and BiBBo..................



Bisex... How much for a handjob???

BiBBz $10... Would you like one???

Bisex.. No. I was just wondering how much I saved doing it myself.
256 Comments
Perjury !!!
Posted:Jul 14, 2018 8:06 pm
Last Updated:Jul 15, 2018 9:07 pm
640 Views


My crack legal team has notified me that I may have perjured myself when I promised to not post Any more late night special treats....



and here I am doing it AGAIN!



Today Sunday May 17th we celebrate ice cream



On May 17, 1984, a bill was introduced by Senator Walter Dee Huddleston of Kentucky, to designate July 1984 as National Ice Cream Month, and July 15, 1984, as National Ice Cream Day.



Senate Joint Resolution 298 was passed and became law after being signed by President Ronald Reagan on July 2. On July 9, President Reagan issued Proclamation 5219. In it, he called ice cream a "nutritious and wholesome food" that over ninety percent of American citizens ate.



He said that almost ten percent of the milk from dairy farms was used to make ice cream at the time. He also said that ice cream provided thousands of jobs for citizens, and was an integral part of the dairy industry.



Although the law was officially just for 1984, the day and the month have both continued to be celebrated. July 15, 1984, was the third Sunday of the month, and National Ice Cream Day has since been celebrated on the third Sunday of July ever since.

12 Comments
La Fête Nationale
Posted:Jul 13, 2018 9:05 pm
Last Updated:Jul 14, 2018 2:39 pm
734 Views


Happy Bastille Day to our friends in France.



Long day for me.. got home and took JD out for dinner and a couple drinks. Thank God for the weekend but that does not save me from a bunch of major tasks that need to be done around here and at my jobsite.
10 Comments
Happy Birthday!
Posted:Jul 12, 2018 8:23 pm
Last Updated:Jul 14, 2018 2:45 pm
858 Views


A Happy 2118th Birthday to Gaius Julius Caesar! Born July 13th 100 BC ! Roman Military Commander and Political Statesman who rose through the political and military ranks of Republican Rome to become Consul in 59 BC, establishing control of Rome by forming the so-called First Triumvirate with Pompey and Crassus.


{ This coin we have was minted by Caesar around 49 BC to commemorate crushing Gaul)

Appointed Governor of 4 legions he conquered Gaul greatly extending Rome's empire. In 49BC Caesar, refusing to give up his command he crossed the Rubicon and ignited civil war.



By Senate decree Caesar was grated Dictator of Rome in 48BC by defeating his opponents before instigating a series of reforms, including the Roman calendar.



He was assassinated in Rome on the Ides of March by a group of conspirators including Brutus. His death led directly to the end of the Roman Republic and the establishment of the Roman Empire under Caesar's heir Augustus.
12 Comments

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